Klondike Redux

6ave_house_night thumbnail
wolf-shack thumbnail
steins thumbnail
RSS-bear thumbnail
puzzleroom thumbnail
mitten thumbnail
griffiths thumbnail
goofy-house thumbnail
DM_touchie thumbnail
church-sign thumbnail
blue-house thumbnail
bill's-cave thumbnail
17_RenschEvan_Duplex-Window thumbnail
atco-painting thumbnail
20_RenschEvan_Playground thumbnail
19_RenschEvan_Phil's-Desk thumbnail
18_RenschEvan_Motel-Facade thumbnail
16_RenschEvan_Kate-and-Johnny thumbnail
15_RenschEvan_Northern-Lights thumbnail
caribou-mural thumbnail
fog-fr-9th-ave-trail thumbnail
miner_statue_web thumbnail
6ave_house_night
wolf-shack
steins
RSS-bear
puzzleroom
mitten
griffiths
goofy-house
DM_touchie
church-sign
blue-house
bill's-cave
17_RenschEvan_Duplex-Window
atco-painting
20_RenschEvan_Playground
19_RenschEvan_Phil's-Desk
18_RenschEvan_Motel-Facade
16_RenschEvan_Kate-and-Johnny
15_RenschEvan_Northern-Lights
caribou-mural
fog-fr-9th-ave-trail
miner_statue_web

Sixth Avenue House

Wolf Shack, Church Street

Lone Pioneer, Dawson City Museum

Taxidermied Brown Bear, Robert Service School

Puzzle Room, Macdonald Lodge Retirement Home

Lost Mitten, Seventh Avenue

Griffiths' Storefront, King Street

Third Avenue House

Gold Rush Banker, Dawson City Museum

Christian Fellowship, Fifth Avenue

Blue House, Church Street

Bill's Cave

Firth Street Duplex

Atco Trailer, Bonanza Road

Playground, Dawson City Daycare

Office, Dawson City Museum

Bonanza Gold Motel

Kate and Johnny

Northern Lights, Eighth Avenue

Caribou Herd, Queen Street

Ninth Avenue Trail View

Placer Miner, Front Street

 

KLONDIKE REDUX
Archival inkjet prints, variable dimensions

The ongoing project Klondike Redux examines the intersection of history and culture in Dawson City, Yukon, a small, geographically isolated town approximately 400 km south of the Arctic Circle.

As site of the famed 1896 Klondike Gold Rush, the community is in constant negotiation with a fin de siècle mythology that now serves as a valued asset helping to power an economy equally as reliant on tourism as gold mining. To date, my images picture the community solely during the winter months—when the vast array of visitors are absent—leaving the relics of past culture to imprint themselves on the habits of daily life.